How restaurants and cafes trying to stay afloat

How restaurants and cafes trying to stay afloat

Since the beginning of the pandemic, in the US alone, 40,000 restaurants, pubs, and cafes were closed, letting go of millions of workers. Some that are still staying try to be inventive to save their business, yet their struggles made them only hulls of what they used to be before.

The measures taken by these places include cutting the monthly rent payments (in some places, up to 100% with conditions applied but usually, it is 25-75% cut); re-specializing from usual opening hours and full menus to serving coffees through a window, preparing to go and for the delivery to callers, and offering pastries and cakes to sell at least something. Some moved to locations with lower rent, and some redesign their menus to cater to clients with lower incomes.

Owners, however, are afraid to speak about surviving this winter – even before the current wave of lockdowns began. Now, with this factor in mind, chances of business survival become even tinier. In New York alone, the business of HoReCa before the pandemics brought about $46 billion in sales annually, paying about $10 B as salaries. Now, with that powerful segment shaping the city shrank more than 75%, around $35 billion of annual gross revenues are taken from the city, which negatively impacts landlords, workers, eaters, and taxes paid.