London is hit by dangerous virus mutation. Result: isolation and desolation

London is hit by dangerous virus mutation. Result: isolation and desolation

The streets of London today are desolated as much as one would see in some post-apocalyptic zombie movie (although without hordes of undead (yet) as in ‘28 Days Later’). Recently, due to another strain of the C-virus, the British government launched the strictest lockdown, meaning the closure of everything but drug and food stores. Londoners escape the capital in tens of thousands to prevent being locked-down in four walls of tiny and expensive apartments. Half of the world has stopped the sea and air transportation of goods and people to and from Britain.

These all result, amongst many, in local taxi graveyards replenished by dozens of rented taxicabs every day, as there is little sense in taxi services today. 20 miles northeast of London, there are thousands of taxi cars parked in a forest abandoned by drivers & brought here by taxi management. They stand bare-roofed in dusty fields surrounded by pigeons and sheep, making a silent monument to the collapse of the British economy suffering from Brexit and Pandemics-2020.

Before the lockdown’s latest wave was announced just days ago, only 15% of all 21,500 licensed taxicabs were working. Last week, more than 50% of the remained stopped functioning, too. ‘It’s awful,’ says Mr. McNamara, General Secretary of the professional taxicab association of England, LTDA. He says that the rest of the parking lots of taxicabs are also full: fields, warehouses, and garages. The City of London, normally whirling with people and noisy sounds, today looks like the first half of the first series of season 1 of ‘The Walking Dead’, with newspapers flying on the wind in eerie silence.