What does the room-temperature superconductor mean for all of us?

What does the room-temperature superconductor mean for all of us?

Superconductors are conductors of magnetic or electric power with no or ignorable losses of energy during its transmission from one point to another. An invention of a superconductor that could work under normal temperature and pressure – like the one in the room you’re in – would potentially save zillions of Watts of lost energy every year. Other uses of such would be very fast computing, much more efficient electricity generation and transfer, significantly better magnetic levitation trains, and vast improvement of various scientific pieces of research (not mentioning the military application like E-bombs).

Before today, pretty much all superconductors could only work under conditions that are only met inside of the molten iron core of our planet – with millions of pounds of pressure per square inch and super low temperatures. Prior to this discovery, the best superconductor humanity has was working under the pressure of approximately 40,000,000 pounds per sq. inch and with -98° F.

Now, there is a study of a professor of physics and mechanical engineering at the University of Rochester, doctor Ranga Dias, who was able to discover a new substance that works in almost a room temperature of +14.4° C (or +58° F). Another parameter of its functioning – pressure – still remains but researchers hope that with further research, they will be able to create a ‘quasi-stable’ substance that will work on the Earth-surface-like pressure with that or similar temperature.

It seems to us that this discovery is quite an improvement and a giant leap to the future!